Coffee House – Final Design

TEXTURISED

Project | Coffee House

Phase | Final Design

Year | 5th Year Design – 2012

Location | Hunter & Crown St Newcastle NSW.

Idea | This project explores the hidden value in existing space which the city holds, it aims to bring to the surface ideas of re-use and revival through dislocations, de-constructions and reconstructions re calibrating the urban fabric, forming complex future urban morphologies which can be built upon whilst retaining the remnants of the city. This project provides a framework for further rehabilitation of lost space within the city of Newcastle.

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Technical Design Phase

 

This submission was was for our technical design phase of the project. The rationale was to present four sheets, plans, sections, details and an exploded axonometric drawing as if these particular sheets had been pulled out of a complete set of working drawings. Continue reading

Developed Design – Coffee House Model

Just thought I would chuck up some images of my 1:100 model for the developed submission. The model was primarily created using a laser cutter at the Uni industrial design workshop. It gives the existing buildings some character with the burnt edges, and also allows you to engrave. This model is actually incomplete, which suits the concept a little. The plan for final is to build a 1:50 model of proposed fragments across the site, showing the major insertions and changes to the existing fabric.

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Newcastle High Speed Rail Station & Hunter St Masterplan

This was our 4th year second design project. The project was to master-plan a 750 meter portion of Newcastle’s Hunter street. This included a large amount of office space and a School of Business district for the University of Newcastle….all this with the inclusion of a national high-speed railway station. The focus of this project was to design a master-plan with the intention of stitching the two sides of the heavy-rail line together in order to provide porosity from the city to the harbors water front, breaking down the invisible walls which have contributed to the cities decline.

There has long been a debate over the heavy-rail line which intersects Newcastle’s city centre segregating the active city with the harbor foreshore. This is true to some extent, however I happen to believe that large developments such as Chalestown Square act as a type of black-hole to the activity and diversity which the city deserves.

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